Detailed Session Information

Session 2.3:

Simulation and observations of complex interacting fault systems

Convenors: S. Jaume (Australia), J. Rundle (USA)


Session Overview: Steven C. Jaume, QUAKES (15 minutes)

Earthquakes do not occur in isolation from one another, but they and the 
faults upon which they occur form a complex web of interacting elements. 
The objective of Session 2.3 is to explore the means by which earthquakes
and faults interact and how this effects the dynamics of earthquake 
occurrence and the resulting space-time patterns of seismicity.  We will 
explore three main topics during this session:
  1. Long/short range interactions versus long/short range correlations in interacting fault systems
  2. Application of frictional relationships to stress transfer and dynamic triggering
  3. Dependance of spatio-temporal seismicity patterns upon the structure of interacting fault systems

1. Long/short range interactions versus long/short range correlations in interacting fault systems

Many simulation models of the earthquake process show highly complex 
behavior even though they include only nearest-neighbor interactions 
among the model elements. However, observations of earthquake triggering 
suggest interactions at distances far greater than an earthquake rupture 
length.  

2. Application of frictional relationships to stress transfer and dynamic triggering

Early attempts to model earthquake and fault interactions assumed a 
simple Coulomb failure criteria for stress transfer.  However, 
laboratory derived frictional relationships show that the failure 
strength on fault surfaces can be highly dependent upon their loading 
history.  This topic will explore the application of these frictional 
relationships to the triggering/shadowing of future earthquake occurrence.

3. Dependance of spatio-temporal seismicity patterns upon the structure of interacting fault systems

Natural fault systems show a high degree of heterogeniety in their 
structure, ranging from fairly simple systems with only one or a few 
active faults to complex regions with many active faults of different 
orientation and sense of slip. Active faults also come in a hierarchy of 
different sizes.

Session Plenary: (1 Hour)

Steven C. Jaume', QUAKES (30 minutes)
Stress Transfer, Dynamic Triggering, and Stress Correlations: 
How Earthquake Occurrence Effects The Timing and Slip of Subsequent 
Earthquakes

John Rundle, University of Colorado (30 minutes)
The Origin of Space-Time Patterns and Correlations in Populations of 
Earthquakes: Self-Organization, Scaling, and the Role of GEM Models and 
Numerical Simulations

Detailed Session: (2.5 Hours)

1. Long/short range interactions versus long/short range correlations in 
interacting fault systems

Chunsheng Lu, Victoria University of Wellington (15 minutes)
Linked stress release model for spatio-temporal seismicity

Discussion and Comments (30 minutes)

2. Application of frictional relationships to stress transfer and 
dynamic triggering

Mitsuhiro Matsu'ura, University of Tokyo (15 minutes)
(no title)

Michael Blanpied, U.S. Geological Survey (15 minutes)
Effect of stress history on earthquake timing

Discussion and Comments (30 minutes)

3. Dependance of spatio-temporal seismicity patterns upon the structure 
of interacting fault systems

Naoyuki Kato, Geological Survey of Japan (15 minutes)  (Joint with 2.1)
Effect of an outer-rise earthquake on seismic cycle of large interplate 
earthquakes estimated from an instability model based on friction 
mechanics

Mengfen Xia, Chinese Academy of Sciences (15 minutes) 
(To be presented in Session 1.2)
Sample-specificity and predictability of material failure

Discussion and Comments (30 minutes)